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Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - Page updated at 12:00 AM

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High School Sports

Flashback: Ron Cey, Mount Tahoma, Class of 1966

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Sport: Baseball

High-school rewind: Cey was a three-sport star, also playing football and basketball. He was Mount Tahoma's first athlete to win nine sports letters. Two years later, Bobby Moore (now Ahmad Rashad) duplicated the feat.

After high school: Played two seasons at Washington State, where coach Bobo Brayton dubbed him the "Penguin" for his stocky build and choppy running style. Cey was a third-round selection by the Dodgers in the 1968 secondary draft and was a mainstay at third base from 1973 through 1982. In 12 seasons, he became the leading home-run hitter in Los Angeles Dodgers history with 228 and was co-MVP of the 1981 World Series. He was a six-time All-Star with the Dodgers before finishing his career with the Chicago Cubs and Oakland A's. He retired in 1987 with 316 career home runs.

After athletics: Cey said he played "Mr. Mom" for the first six or seven years after retirement. Five years ago, he began handling a variety of special events for the Dodgers and often serves as a greeter for guests in suites at Dodger Stadium. Cey is also involved in charitable community events.

Personal: Cey and his wife, Fran, have been married 33 years and have lived in Woodland Hills, Calif., for three decades. They have a 28-year-old son, Daniel, and 26-year-old daughter, Amanda. Daniel, a shortstop, was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in 1996 and reached Class AAA before retiring from baseball. Ron's father, Frank, still lives in Tacoma.

Fast forward: Cey appreciated the time he spent with his kids after retirement.

"I needed a change of pace and I felt I needed to make up for all of the time I had missed with them as a father."

One of his best memories from his professional days was playing in the 1979 All-Star Game in Seattle.

"I got to go back up there and play in the old Kingdome and stay with my parents," Cey said.

— Sandy Ringer

Copyright © 2004 The Seattle Times Company

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